National Poetry Month Post #2: Read “Genesis of A Street Warrior” by Leslie Reese

Our house was one block west of Woodward Avenue – the street that divided Detroit’s east and west neighborhoods. One Saturday when I was 8 years old, my mother taught me how to ride public transportation by myself. Mommy told me to keep the coins for bus fare in my shoe until I got on…

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National Poetry Month Post #1: Read “rhythm and ocean meditation #1” by Leslie Reese

rhythm and ocean meditation #1 for Pamela and Gerald your hand molds the terra cotta of my soul i am a bowl. you may line me with mysterious fragments of earth’s rough turf and rosebuds, blanket me with a silken sky; throw multicolored prayer beads in my bell, pelting me with your deep lovecraft your…

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Are You Apprehensive About Reading Books by Black Authors? A Chat with #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Creator, Didi Borie

It’s February and that means Black History Month in the United States, which also means #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge 2018 is underway! #ReadSoulLit is the brainchild of Didi Borie, who shares her impressions of the books she reads on her blog and book tube channel, both aptly named Brown Girl Reading. Didi and I first got…

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Re-Reading Black Folktales by Julius Lester (1939-2018)

A few weeks ago, I re-read Black Folktales by Julius Lester, and posted a short review of it on goodreads.com.  This morning I opened up yesterday’s New York Times and learned that Julius Lester died last Thursday, January 18, 2018.  I’m rather dismayed. Here, I post my [goodreads] review with images. I just re-read Julius…

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#Throwback Thursday: What Do Louise DeSalvo and Aesop Have in Common?

Greetings! Happy 2018! I’ve elected to re-publish one of my early posts – back when I had about four followers!- while I figure out what I want to do with folklore & literacy this year. Enjoy! “Some folks they rip and run/Some folks don’t believe in sign/ But you get me babe/You got to take…

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Memories Evoked While Reading The Cooking Gene by Michael W. Twitty

How I feel about food and why I wanted to read The Cooking Gene Food can be soulful, pleasurable, nourishing, and fortifying. It can heal, and bring people together. When we eat, we may partake of the natural world’s bounty and beauty, satisfying hunger and desire. But when it comes to talking about food in…

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😘To The African Book Addict!, With Love!

What are your ideas about being well-read? Do you consider yourself to be well-read? I was asked this question by Darkowaa, who hosts African Book Addict!, a wonderful blog where she writes well-informed, thoughtfully considered, refreshingly invigorating reviews, recommendations, author interviews, and other bookish content from Africa and the Diaspora. Today’s post on African Book…

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Let’s Talk About Dandies! A Look at Shantrelle P. Lewis’s Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style

As I flipped through the pages of Shantrelle P. Lewis’s Dandy Lion: The Black Dandy and Street Style, I recalled the black men of style I grew up seeing in Detroit during the 1960s and 1970s. Words like “clean,” “sharp,” “cold,” and “tight” were used to compliment and signify on how artfully their looks had…

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“Back to School Reading Lists: featuring Cauleen Smith’s “Human _3.0 Reading List”

It’s September, the month when teachers everywhere are passing out reading lists of all kinds. What would you imagine to be on a “Human_3.0 Reading List”? Last Thursday, I visited the Art Institute of Chicago to find out. In 2015-2016, Interdisciplinary Artist and Filmmaker Cauleen Smith made a series of 57 graphite and watercolor drawings…

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Celebrating the Birthday of Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000)

Two years after the Detroit riots (also known as the the 12th Street Riot, the 1967 Rebellion and the Uprising of 1967), and one year after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Gwendolyn Brooks – the first Black person to be awarded a Pulitzer Prize, for her book Annie Allen (1949) – did something…

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