Love At First Sight: The Woman Who Read Too Much by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani

When you are roaming around in bookstores and libraries, or maybe waiting for your prescription to be filled at a drugstore, what is it about a book that will make you walk over and get physically acquainted with it? Is it the book’s title? Is it something visual like cover illustrations or design? Maybe even…

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“Reading Opens Up My Imagination”

My nine-year-old nephew Caleb qualifies as a bonafide nerd—and I mean this in a spirit of utmost admiration. One afternoon recently when I was visiting he jumped-up and said “It’s time for me to read, now. This is my favorite part of doing my homework.” (His older siblings snicker about him in a proud way…

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Detroit Poem: “I Love You (The Heidelberg Project)” by Leslie Reese

I Love You (The Heidelberg Project) for Tyree Guyton I love you I know the workings seem obtuse in this rubble glitter sanctuary you portrait my face like doll’s my knees burnt by pavement and eye-blinking teeth-missing kids blooming heartflowers from a window box of thundering polka-dots & new psalms scripted in the queen anne’s…

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Soulful Nourishment: Getting A Whiff of Julie Dash’s New Project

This morning while reading one of my favorite blogs—Michael Twitty’s Afroculinaria—I learned about a very important project that I have to mention here on folklore & literacy. It represents a wonderful convergence of many of my favorite things: folklove expressed through storytelling art, food, culture, history, and memory! I sigh with longing just thinking about…

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Black History Month Observance: A Collaboration Between Myself & A Stranger

Yesterday I opted to enjoy a “Fishy” salad (yes, it really is called a “Fishy” salad on the menu) at Z & H Market Cafe while catching-up on my reading. I felt woefully behind on my reading of The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson—one of the books I chose to read especially…

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Leslie’s Black History Month Homage to Retro “YA”Titles

These books were all originally published between the years of 1967 and 1973, and I hadn’t seen or thought about them in decades.  But while considering the “Young Adult/Middle Grade” theme for February 3rd of the #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge my mind drifted back to the earliest books I ever read that featured young black characters….

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What Do Louise DeSalvo and Aesop Have In Common?

  “Some folks they rip and run/Some folks don’t believe in sign/ But you get me babe/You got to take your time/ Because I’m built for comfort/I ain’t built for speed….”  —excerpt from Willie Dixon’s “Built for Comfort Not for Speed” The appearance of Aesop dates back to around 2500 years ago and he is said to…

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