Black History Month Observance: A Collaboration Between Myself & A Stranger

Yesterday I opted to enjoy a “Fishy” salad (yes, it really is called a “Fishy” salad on the menu) at Z & H Market Cafe while catching-up on my reading. I felt woefully behind on my reading of The Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson—one of the books I chose to read especially…

Continue reading →

Leslie’s Black History Month Homage to Retro “YA”Titles

These books were all originally published between the years of 1967 and 1973, and I hadn’t seen or thought about them in decades.  But while considering the “Young Adult/Middle Grade” theme for February 3rd of the #ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge my mind drifted back to the earliest books I ever read that featured young black characters….

Continue reading →

What Do Louise DeSalvo and Aesop Have In Common?

  “Some folks they rip and run/Some folks don’t believe in sign/ But you get me babe/You got to take your time/ Because I’m built for comfort/I ain’t built for speed….”  —excerpt from Willie Dixon’s “Built for Comfort Not for Speed” The appearance of Aesop dates back to around 2500 years ago and he is said to…

Continue reading →

It’s Getting Hot in Here: What’s all this talk about diversity?

Recently, Didi—over at Brown Girl Reading—posted about reading diversely on her great blog for book-lovers of all kinds. Her post has generated nearly 50 comments from all over the globe thus far. She reminded readers that diverse means “variety” and “different;” then took umbrage with BookTuber “hoopla” on YouTube and said “If you want to…

Continue reading →

‘A beauty that bursts the banks of logic’—Reading: The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna

(Quoted passages are from the 2010 hardcover edition of The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna). “He did know the birds expended such energy in flight they needed to drink twice their body weight in nectar each day. Such effort invested in the mere fact of existence. Sometimes nature’s way did not bear scrutiny, only…

Continue reading →

Why Literacy?: Who I am and Why I am here [in the blogoshpere] Part 1

This post was written in response to a wordpress blogging 101 writing task in which bloggers were charged with answering the question “Who am I and why am I here?” In 2011 after training to become an adult literacy volunteer at Literacy Chicago, I had the great fortune to be turned-on to Reading Against the…

Continue reading →

Aromas of Family Folklore

Recipes have a funny way of being a part of one’s history.  Whole stewpots of memories simmer in the burners of my heart with the precious aromas of family folklore.  For instance, my Uncle Colvin used to visit relatives on Saturday mornings after he and Aunt Joni’s weekly sunrise trip to Eastern Market.  He considered…

Continue reading →

Writer’s Choice: Thoughts About The Stories We Expect Certain Writers to Deliver

I have been thoroughly manipulated by Aminatta Forna’s writing skills.  The Hired Man is her novel about a Croatian man named Duro who feels compelled to tell the reader about Gost—his native village—during the Yugoslav civil war and its aftermath.  Duro is the “hired man.” A hunter, carpenter, painter, auto mechanic and protector; never married…

Continue reading →

%d bloggers like this: